Bob Falter, CRS, GRI - ERA Key Realty Services | 508-612-1649 | [email protected]


Posted by Bob Falter, CRS, GRI on 2/20/2019

Pets are such adorable creatures; they bring tremendous warmth, love, and fun to family life. Just like humans, they've all got their body odors which if left unaddressed can become very offensive. By adopting the suggestions listed below, you would be able to get rid of pet odors from your home.

  • Bathe and Groom your pet: It is important to bathe and groom your pet often to keep them as clean as you want your home as well as curb shedding in unwanted place/quantities. You can learn to appropriately bathe and groom your pet by booking a session with a professional, requesting guidance from your vet or local pet store or browsing the internet.
  • Air Your Home and Take Your Stuff Out to The Sunlight: Most times the process of eliminating odors always involve a great ton of air. Airing alone is believed to take a large part of the scent away before any other thing you do, so you should vacuum your home and every corner that your pet fancy staying to get that freshness again - open up all doors and windows so fresh air and sunlight can make its way home. Also, leave all your furniture, utilities, rugs and any other material that you have got tainted with pet odor, outside in the sunlight. Sunlight is an excellent natural bleaching agent and will help remove any smell trapped within the fibers that airing alone might not get.
  • Find the source of the odors: Before the odors, came the cause of the odors. So, find them and get rid of them. Often, the scent may already be worked up into the floors or any other part of the house not exposed to air. If its pet urine, you'll need to dry it up with paper towels or a mop. When done, you will need to use either a vinegar solution or an enzymatic cleaner to break down the odors. You may also choose to go with a professional stain and odor remover to finish the job. Whatever you do, make sure you get a cleaner that is not toxic to the health of your pets to prevent accidents.

Keeping your home smelling fresh as well as your pet does not have to be an arduous task. These suggestions will come in handy for you, and you can also visit your local pet store for nontoxic cleaners to make your home smell even more delightful.




Tags: cleaning tips   pets   pet odor  
Categories: Cleaning   pet odor   homeowner  


Posted by Bob Falter, CRS, GRI on 10/4/2017

It has been said that owning a dog is like having a two year old that stays two for his entire life. There is some truth in this statement. Dogs--like children--have many needs, and each dog has a unique personality. But, as any dog owner will tell you, there is no greater joy than coming home to your tail-wagging, slobbering best friend. There are several factors you should consider before getting a dog. You'll want to think about how much time you have to spend with the dog, your family's ability to contribute to caring for him or her, and how suitable your home and yard are.

Your dog's new home

If you've always wanted a large, playful dog, you should think about the size of your home and yard. Big dogs and dogs with high energy need a lot of room to run around in. If you live on a busy road would you consider putting up a fence to keep your dog safe from traffic? If not you might have to tether your dog to a run in the backyard, which is significantly less fun and exercise for the both of you. Inside the home poses another challenge. If you are considering a puppy, know that there is much training involved to keep your dog safe and your house in one piece. One of the many benefits of adopting an older dog is that they tend to already be housebroken, avoiding a lot of clean-ups and chewed furniture.

Raising a dog is a team effort

If you are thinking about getting a puppy or a high energy dog (in other words, a "permanent puppy") it's important to recognize that your whole family will have to be on the same page when it comes to training. Your dog takes cues from your family's behavior. So if one person in your family allows the dog to jump up on them when another doesn't it will give the dog mixed signals. This is also true for rewarding good behavior. Your dog should obey each member of your family because they trust them, not fear them or feel dominant over them. Play-time and treats are a great way to build that trust with every member of your household.

Please consider adopting

We all have the image in our heads of our children playing with a new puppy. But the same joy and bonding can come from adopting an older dog. When you adopt, you can teach your kids the value of rescuing and caring for animals that have been neglected. What's more, adopting is also a way to show support for shelters rather than puppy mills who often breed puppies in poor conditions.

Guidelines for dogs and your home

  • If you have a small home and yard, get a small dog or an older, low-energy dog
  • Likewise, take the dog on lots of walk to make up for missed exercise in the yard
  • If you have a wooded yard be extra vigilant about ticks and fleas
  • Training never ends for you or your dog. Make sure you are constantly working with your dog





Posted by Bob Falter, CRS, GRI on 4/12/2017

IMG_7400Congratulations. You have welcomed a new puppy into your home. You are excited and likely rushed out to purchase a dog bed, feeding dishes, treats, and toys. Did you remember to pick up a book or video on dog training? Why not? Many new pet owners are so concerned with finding the right comfort amenities; they focus little time on thinking about how they will teach their pup. No matter how old the puppy is when he or she becomes part of your extended family, the time to start training is now. Start teaching your dog to be an obedient and loving companion right from the start. Be A Leader Puppies, born part of a litter, need a strong pack leader. That is you! Be consistent and firm in all your commands. Take the lead. Always have your puppy follow you, not walk ahead when taking him/her for a walk. When you lead, you show your dog that you are the leader of the pack. If you let your dog lead, the puppy will feel that they are in charge. Be the first of “the pack” to go in and out of the door or when entering a room. Remember, you are the leader, not the other way around. By firmly taking charge, you provided you dog with a feeling of security and establish the “ground rules” for being part of your household. Dogs sense confidence and will take control of any situation where they feel the leader is timid or weak. Excessive barking, leash pulling, chewing, resistance to toilet training or other destructive behaviors are evidence of a dog that lacks a leader. For your puppy to become a sociable, obedient and loyal dog, he/she needs to bond with you as a strong leader, not a complacent caregiver. All commands and rewards should remain consistent throughout your puppy’s early training and adulthood. Choose simple commands beginning with “No” for unwanted behavior, “Come” when you want him to follow you, “Down” when he tries to jump up on you or other people, and “Stay” when you want the puppy to remain in place. Discover your dog’s favorite treat and reserve that treat for training purposes only. Establishing Boundaries When you are ready to introduce your dog to your yard, put on his/her collar. When you let him out the door, connect him to the lead. If he starts heading out of the yard, you need to verbally correct him with a “NO” command. If continues to stray correct him with the lead. When he stops on your “NO” command praise and lovingly reward him with a treat. Keep Training Sessions Short The world is an intriguing place full of new sights and smells. A young, energetic and excited puppy has a short attention span, so keep training session short. Rather than have one long session, break up training efforts into several short session each day. Barking If you are concerned about correctly training your puppy to be an efficient and effective guard dog, begin his/her training early by allowing your dog to bark a couple of times when a stranger arrives at your door. Praise him/her for sounding an alarm. Then give the command “stop barking” while you hold out a training treat in front of him. Your dog cannot smell and sniff the treat and bark at the same time so will stop barking immediately. After your dog has quieted down for a few minutes, reward him with the treat.




Tags: pets   dogs   training  
Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Bob Falter, CRS, GRI on 10/19/2016

Tips For Training Your Puppy Rescuing a puppy in need of food, warmth, shelter, and love is a heart-motivated event. Inviting your new friend into your home, a joy-filled act of love and compassion that is often amongst a pet owner’s most cherished memories. Begin Basic Obedience Training Early The first few weeks of your puppy’s time in his new environment should be focused primarily on socializing and bonding. Begin basic training early. Be a leader and establish boundaries and a pup’s house training process. To avoid chewed up shoes and soiled carpets, note unwanted behavior with a stern “No” command and positive behavior with “Good Dog”, a tasty treat and loving praise. Be firm in voice and actions. Your dog senses your level of confidence and responses accordingly. It is a whole lot easier to teach your puppy how you want him to behave now than to try to correct bad habits later. While your puppy’s body is still growing, his brain is fully developed and ready to learn. Just remember puppies are young, curious, and have a short attention span becoming easily bored or distracted. Keep lesson times brief, but frequent throughout the day. A puppy is constantly learning; train early and train often. Make sure your dog learns positive lessons and not the wrong ones. Always be consistent with your commands. In all circumstances use the same primary words such as “come”, “sit”, “stay”, and “down”. These are the same commands you will use throughout your dog’s life. Whatever words you choose for these basic instructions does not matter, just be sure to always use the same command for each desired positive behavior. It is imperative that you can control your dog to ensure his/her safety. The best way to ensure that your new pet will become an obedient and pleasing companion is to train your pup well from the start. A well-socialized dog is relaxed, friendly, and at ease around new people and in new situations. During training, reward positive response to your command with a tasty treat, effusive praise, and physical affection. You are the “Alpha” leader and your dog wants to please. Puppy “Boot Camp” Look online or in the phone book to locate a local puppy “boot camp” program for early dog training. Interacting with other dogs is a great way for your puppy to learn to socialize and get over separation anxiety from his/her littermates. Ask Others For Help Seek help from other family members and friends. Enlist the help of older children in the training process so that they can learn along with the new addition to the family. The more people you can involve in your dog’s training, the better. You don’t want your dog to view you as the only individual whose commands he must obey. Having other people involved in your dog’s training is also helpful in keeping him from regressing in your absence. Special Training Treats Training treats should be small and highly flavorful with a strong scent. Professional trainers, often use dehydrated bites of chicken liver or salmon jerky nuggets. Find a special treat that your puppy especially enjoys and reserve it for training rewards only.




Tags: pets   dogs   puppy  
Categories: Uncategorized